Photo Gallery for Forth & Clyde canal (between the Stables and Bowling) - Scroll down to see all the photos:


Forth & Clyde Canal east of Cadder
Forth & Clyde Canal near Cadder Church
(Above) The Forth and Clyde canal when heading east from Bishopbriggs becomes more wooded, and again more attractively 'river like', nearer to the Cadder Church area. Above Photos looking both ways from the same spot.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services

Maryhill Locks at Forth & Clyde canal Maryhill Locks
(Above) Coming down the impressive Maryhill Locks.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services.

Maryhill Locks
Maryhill Locks
(Above) Another perspective of the Maryhill Locks - Stone built, with heart shaped short pounds between each chamber
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services
(Above) Leaving the biggest of all the F&C locks - Lock 25 at Maryhill
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services.

Bottom of Maryhill Locks on the Kelvin Aqueduct River Kelvin at Maryhill
(Above) On the approach to Lock 25 at Maryhill (facing east), Willow moored on the River Kelvin Aqueduct (left photo). Then looking over the wall on the aqueduct, down to the River Kelvin below (right photo)
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services

Loch 27 Forth & Clyde Canal
No water shortages here - top gates are designed to allow over flow
(Above) Lock 27 at Temple from the east - the locking team takes a well earned lunch break at the moorings below this lock, when heading uphill from Bowling to Maryhill.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services
(Above) Excess water cascades over top gates at Lock 31, near(ish) to Willow's stern. In the absence of by-washes the gates are designed with this in mind. English canals seem to have frequent water shortages that can even stop the navigation (2011 season). Not so here - our Scottish canals have large very adequate supply resevoirs (lochs), even during exceptionally dry summers. 
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services

Pleasant stretch heading for Clydebank Pleasant canal heading for Clydebank
(Above) Just a couple of views to illustrate that, although often urban, the Maryhill to Drumchapel stretch does have its attractive parts.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services

Canal Bascule Bridge
Lock 35 on the Forth & Clyde Canal
(Above) Bard Avenue Bascule Bridge near Drumchapel - these charming bascule lift bridges were commonly used on the Forth & Clyde Canal. A yacht, using the Forth and Clyde canal to make transit from east to west coast, waits for us to pass.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services
(Above) Looking back at Lock 35. When travelling west it means there's only one more Lock and a Bascule before stopping for lunch at Clydebank (Fish & Chips at McMonagles?)
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services

Chippie at Clydebank
Clydebank Retail Park

(Above) A big attraction at Clydebank. McMonagles - A real ship (albeit permantly moored into concrete) now converted into a fish and chip shop, with posher fish restaurant above. We've visited behind their frying area and the technology of their kit is top notch. In the photo above, staff pass out fish and chips to Irene on Willow lying alongside - and none of this should miss that they're probably the best fish & chips we've tasted.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services
(Above) The larger of the two hydraulic ram lift bridges at the Clydebank Retail Park.
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services.

Dalmuir Drop Lock
Dalmuir Drop Lock

(Above) The Dalmuir Drop Lock. When the canal fell into disuse in the 1960s they just built a road across the top. On restoration at the beginning of this century, they could hardly destroy that new road bridge. So instead they built a huge lock chamber extending at least a boat length, and more, either side of the bridge. Boats now enter the full lock chamber from either side. The water is then pumped out of the lock chamber via sluices either end of the chamber. The level drops and the boat(s) then have head room suffiicient to pass under the road bridge to the opposite end of the chamber. Once through, water is then pumped back into the chamber to bring the water level back up to as shown. The lock gates are then opened and the boat(s) permitted to continue up the canal.
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services.
(Above) Another photo of the Dalmuir Drop Lock (the only one of its type in the UK). It doesn't happen too quickly so time for a chat with the Scottish canals staff.
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services.

Under the road at the Dalmuir Drop Lock
Clydebank Retail Park

(Above) With the Dalmuir Drop Lock in the 'dropped' water level position, Willow makes the passage under the road bridge. Once clear of the bridge, water will be pumped back into the chamber to bring the level back up to the same as the canal level.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services
(Above) We don't recommend overnight mooring between Maryhill and Old Kilpatrick. However, parts of the canal are not only interesting, but pleasant to look at too. Here on the stretch just west of Clydebank.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services

Approach to Bowling on the Forth & Clyde Canal
Clydebank Retail Park

(Above) Another pleasant enough stretch between Clydebank and Bowling - featuring the 'Bascule' bridges typical of the western end of the F&C canal. The two platforms are lifted with heavy but manual rack and pinion mechanisms, using long windlasses. They're hard work so we give a toot on the horn to stop the staff having to lift them higher than necessary.This is the Farm Road Bascule (now just a pedestrian bridge).
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services
(Above) Getting nearer to Bowling with the Kilpatrick Braes appearing - soon to be a northern backdrop to the canal.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services.

Morning at Bowling on the Forth & Clyde Canal
Evening at Bowling on the Forth & Clyde Canal

(Above) Morning mist at our Bowling moorings.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services
(Above) The view from beside the sea lock at Bowling - looking west out over the River Clyde.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services.

Sea Boats at Bowling on the Forth & Clyde Canal
Bowling on the Forth & Clyde Canal

(Above) The lower basin at Bowling, looks more akin to a sea-going marina than a canal basin. All these sea boats only need to drop down the sea lock to enter the tidal Firth of Clyde.
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services
(Above) The inner part of the lower basin at Bowling. We had brought Willow up the tidal Clyde, following her move from English waters. We had shortened her hull by 4 feet (to fit in the Scottish locks), so here we finished the refit to Willow's interior. The pontoons in the basin only normally used by shorter vessels. For us to get power for our tools we had to straddle the ends of three pontoons. Our ex-navy FML moored to the right of the picture.
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services.

Bowling on the Forth & Clyde Canal
Bowling on the Forth & Clyde Canal

(Above) Another view of the lower basin at Bowling - this time showing the sea lock down onto the Clyde.
Photo Credit: Scott Marine Services.
(Above) Under the old railway bridge (middle distance in above photo) takes you through to the photographers stand point in the photo above left.
Photo Credits: Scott Marine Services

Old Kilpatrick from the Forth & Clyde Canal
Bowling in Autumn

(Above) The church at Old Kilpatrick - viewed from the canal just to the east of Bowling
Photo Credit: Kevin Castle, Evesham
(Above) An autumnal approach to Bowling from the east.
Photo Credit: Kevin Castle, Evesham.