Main Cruise Routes and Suggested Itineraries:

We provide a broad choice of cruising options. This page describes cruising route options for those wanting a three to ten day cruise. See the relevant page for details of the fixed routes used on our one or two day cruises.

Choosing your Holiday Route: The first part of this page describes the cruising range in some detail with maps etc. Lower down on the page we describe the specific cruise routes we offer. If you want to skip the detailed lengthy descriptive part and go directly to our standard cruises click here - Go To Standard Cruises.

Broadly speaking, our cross Scotland cruising range is from Bowling on the Firth of Clyde to Edinburgh City Centre via the Falkirk Wheel. However there are lots of things to see and do (and places to visit) in between. Every private charter client is different and we can vary our cruise routes and available activities to suit individual tastes. There are clients who would wish to go for extensive walks - and those who would wish to avoid doing so. Some like to shop - and there are some husbands who would prefer not to. There are those who have a particular interest in the unusual technology of the Scottish canals - others who are more interested in visiting the Palace at Linlithgow (Mary Queen of Scots) or Edinburgh's Royal Mile and Palace of Holyroodhouse.

A special mention here for magnificent Edinburgh - the canal visitor moorings are a mere 10/15 minutes walk from Edinburgh Castle, the Royal Mile, and Princes Street. Why not watch this YouTube Edinburgh Video Clip (11mins), professionally produced by STV in 2009 (note: the Princes Street roadworks are gone and it is now fully re-opened - the sleek City Trams have arrived). We think Edinburgh has a special atmosphere, and we can moor there for either one, two, or even three, full days - giving guests plenty of opportunity to tour the many Edinburgh city centre sites and attractions. Transport in the city centre is cheap and convenient. If you are with us in August we have the added attraction of the world famous 'Edinburgh Fringe' - not to mention the Royal Military Tattoo (but that needs to be booked online in advance, preferably in the Jan-Feb before).

Before specifying each standard cruise on offer, we first provide general descriptions of the Forth & Clyde and Union canal routes. The descriptions summarise: our usual mooring stopovers, attractions, and particular points of interest. By detailing these factors first there is less repetition when describing the individual standard cruise options. Each of the mooring locations referred to are marked on the following simple map - then further described in more detail with photos etc, by clicking on the small map thumbnails.

The Scottish Canals Route 'app': For those of you with an Android or Apple smart phone or tablet, we recommend e-canalmapp as a guide 'app' to the Scottish Canals. We have assisted in the checking and validation of the 'app' on the Scottish Lowland Canals and we would not hesitate in endorsing the product. Author Mike Kelly is an experienced boater, and clearly dedicated to providing good service to canal users. Price of the 'app' is a mere 3.99 for the Android version and only slightly more for the Apple version. If you come armed with the 'app' already installed on your device, you can follow each turn and bend of the canal as we cruise - complete with all it's POIs, etc. Your chosen version of the 'app' can be obtained from the e-canalamapp website, just click on their logo .....

This is a long webpage with potentially lots of information. We have prepared a 'pdf' version which will open with this link 'pdf' version. Going to that document will allow you to simply download the pdf then simply print off a copy.

Map of Scottish Lowland Canals

Forth and Clyde Canal:

(Click on the small map thumbnails for photos etc of that particular area)

Falkirk Wheel to The Kelpies & Helix:

ThumbnailHeading east from the Falkirk Wheel, after just a mile, we  start our descent down the 14 locks which will take us to the new Helix part of the canal system - with the Kelpies massively standing each side of the lock gateway to the Forth & Clyde canal. Distance-wise the whole trip from the Falkirk Wheel down to the Kelpies is almost exactly 4 miles but it will take us several hours to negotiate the locks. Despite the fact tha much of the route is urban, much work has been done and the canal is pleasant with neatly trimmed verges - and it's a pleasing view of urban Falkirk - not at all 'run down' like some urban waterways. Then of course there is the Helix Park, a massive urban regeneration project, with miles of land redeveloped into parkland areas, criss crossed with cycleways. In my view, the Kelpies are the central attraction of the Helix. The Kelpies are winners of the Salitire Awards, best described by looking at the photos. Writing this in November, 2014, there is still much work to be done with the park aspect of the Helix - it still needs to mature - but as time goes on this place is going to be a real credit to this area of Scotland.

Falkirk Wheel to Auchinstarry Moorings:

ThumbnailHeading west from the Falkirk Wheel, the Forth & Clyde canal is almost river-like in parts. The first point of interest is the hydraulic lift road bridge at Bonnybridge. Then we have the four Castlecary locks taking us west to the Dullatur Marsh section, with its pleasant panoramic views of the Kilsyth Hills to the north, and Antonine Wall to the south. Then into a meandering, very attractive, wooded section with Croy Hill rising steeply on the south bank. One of our common overnight mooring options is at Auchinstarry Basin marina, just south of Kilsyth. This provides good opportunities for those that like walking. The close by Kelvin Valley Country Park area has a number of sign posted country walking routes. Auchinstarry is a popular spot for boaters.

Auchinstarry to Stables (just west of Kirkintilloch):

ThumbnailWest of Auchinstarry the canal continues to meander, river-like, skirting Castle Hill, Strone Point - the 'Devil's Elbow' area of the canal - it's a lovely stretch. Then at Twechar we negotiate another hydraulic lift road bridge on the approach to Kirkintilloch. After a further road swing bridge at Hillhead, we pass through Kirkintilloch town itself. The built up area is only with us for about 30 minutes, before the canal returns to its rural aspect. Another of our routine overnight mooring locations is at the Stables pub moorings, just west of Kirkintilloch. There has been many a morning, when a short towpath walk of only 50 yards or so, has revealed a family of Roe deer playing in the fields opposite. Stand very still and they won't notice you.

Stables to Bowling (Main Line):

ThumbnailLeaving the Stables, westbound, we soon arrive at Cadder Church - we can moor there temporarily to have a look at the graveyard. It was the graveyard frequented by the infamous 'Burke & Hare' grave robbers - then working as canal workers. It is believed that the pair took the stolen cadavers by canal to Edinburgh where they were sold to doctors of the time - carrying out post mortems in the 'interests of medical science'. There is still evidence within the graveyard of efforts made by the church to prevent the criminal export of bodies.
 
After Cadder the canal skirts the northern edge of Glasgow and becomes somewhat urban. At Stockingfield a canal branch heads off south for about 3 miles right into the centre of Glasgow - but remaining on the mainline we soon reach the Maryhill Locks - the start of a 10 mile stretch with 17 locks down to the uppper area at Bowling. Although urban in parts, this length of canal is is not at all unattractive, with the interest of it's traditional Bascule lift bridges, unique drop lock - and the need for some quite unusual locking techniques (due to Willow's length).

At Clydebank, our westbound lunchtime stop we have the option of Fish & Chips from McMonagales - the ship chippie (and they are good). Then there's the Dalmuir Drop Lock (currently the only working version in the world).

As we approach Bowling the canal runs very close and parallel to the tidal Clyde. On a cruise in 2012 we were 'overtaken' by a sea-going container ship - less than a hundred yards away on the Clyde. Then there's Bowling with its sea going boats and views of the Clyde.

The Glasgow Branch:

ThumbnailAt Stockingfield a canal branch heads off south for about 3 miles right into the centre of Glasgow. A very urban environment passing modern flats and older tenaments. Some pleasant views of the city skyline to the west but frankly quite austere. Suprisingly then that we often see Roe deer in the Firhill area. We can (if you insist) moor overnight at the Scottish Canals HQ at Applecross. Fenced and locked in - probably a sensible precaution if mooring in the city - we prefer to cruise into the city, then cruise back out again to moor up at the Stables or Auchinstarry.



Union Canal:

(Click on the small map thumbnails for photos etc of that particular area)

The Falkirk Wheel and our Basin moorings:

ThumbnailUp until the 1960s the link between the Union canal and the Forth & Clyde canal was by a flight of 11 locks at Falkirk. Then the canal fell into dereliction and those 11 locks were subsequently filled in and built over. So when both canals were being restored at the beginning of this century they needed an alternative to the 11 locks - hence the 'Millenium Link' consisting of the Falkirk Wheel, together with Jubilee Lock and the Roughcastle staircase locks (with a new bit of canal to join up with the original course of the Union cana).

The Falkirk Wheel is, of course, an attraction in its own right with its visitor centre, mooring basin, and educational water park set in the grounds of the complex. Less well known are the local walks with paths from the 'Wheel' connecting with the Antonine Wall, local woodland walks, and site of the Rough Castle Roman Fort. A pleasant, quiet, and pretty walk to the Rowantree Burn (where it crosses the Wall). An overnight mooring in the Basin will reveal the spectacular Wheel coloured lights display - with calm waters, it produces some stunning reflections in the basin.

Falkirk to Vellore Bridge:

ThumbnailHeading generally eastwards from the Falkirk Wheel, the canal follows an elevated course following the original 240ft contour all the way to Edinburgh. This first section remains suprisingly clear of Falkirk town with occasional views over the town's rooftops below and just to the north.

Soon the canal passes through Falkirk Tunnel (680yards) through solid rock. Hewn out of solid rock, The tunnel is fascinating with a cavernous nature in parts (see the photos).

Apart from a short section through Redding, we are kept 'divorced' from nearby towns and villages. For most of this section there are frequent panoramic views to the north of the canal - the Ochil Hills to the north and Lomond Hills of Fife to the northeast. To the south of the canal, views are also pleasant but the canal is mainly overlooked by alternating woods and farmers fields. The canal stays at the same level by winding backwards and forwards around hillsides, embankments and wooded cuttings. The Hall Glen area is beautifully quiet and there's every chance of seeing kingfishers. In mid summer the towpath is almost hidden from view by reeds and long grasses - quite charming.

Leaving Polmont, behind the canal revisits its elevated position looking over the Forth to Fife, before passing the little church at Almond Castle. Within a hundred yards of the church we have one of our regular mooring locations at Vellore Bridge - an offside grassed picnic area and quayside.

Vellore Bridge to Avon Aqueduct and Linlithgow:

ThumbnailWithin half an hour of leaving Vellore Bridge we arrive at the Avon Aqueduct. It's the longest, highest, aqueduct in Scotland and, in the UK, only second in size to the Welsh Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. The similarities between the two aqueducts (both carrying the canal in an iron trough) should not be suprising as both were designed/built by Thomas Telford.  We personally think the view down to the River Avon below is even prettier than the views from the Pontcysyllte. On our aqueduct we are able to stop on the top for a time using the provided mooring rings (with so few boats up here we are unlikely to cause an obstruction). So plenty of time to get off for a while to have a look. Walkers will also appreciate the Muiravonside country park directly below the aqueduct (with convenient stepped footpaths down from the towpath).

Moving east from the aqueduct we head for Linlithgow, passing the attractive old canal stables at Woodcockdale - our favoured mooring alternative to Vellore bridge. Moving on to Linlithgow we regularly moor in the Linlithgow Basin. The canal again takes an elevated position above the town, but its well worth the short walk down into the town. A 'market town' with traditional shops rather than merely repeated branches of the same old national retail outlets (eg Linlithgow is known for its traditional craft shops). Then, of course, there is the Linlithgow Palace - home/birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots. A visit to the palace is a 'must' for many guests.

Linlithgow to Almond Aqueduct:

ThumbnailLeaving Linlithgow we soon enter the area of the 'Bings' between Philipstoun and Broxburn. Bings are spoil heaps of shale used in an old process whereby oil was extracted from the shale by the use of extreme heat. Seemingly a much safer process that modern Fracking. The heat process turned much of the waste shale red in colour - quite interesting and not that ugly. The Bings are now used locally for motocross bike riding. Much of the canal passage through this area is via attractive wooded cuttings (so the Bings are largely hidden from view). One of our American guests described the wooded cutting areas as 'Bambi's home' - quite apt. Broxburn itself is not very pretty, but within 10 minutes we pass through and the canalscape returns to a rural setting with panoramic views of the Pentland Hills to the south.

South of Broxburn, we pass under the M8 motorway then a local railway line - before turning due east. The motorway soon disappears to the north side of local hills and we wind backwards and forwards round the hillsides to reach the Almond Aqueduct.

There is a wharf area on the south side of the aqueduct, with a Lade providing additional mooring facilities. The Lade (a mini canal) is of interest.  Three km upstream of the Aqueduct, water flows from the river into the Lade and is then carried along the side of the river valley until it reaches the canal at the aqueduct (the river, of course, has now fallen by 23m below the aqueduct). That Lade, bringing water from the Almond itself, is the main water source for the canal.  The Almond Aqueduct (the second highest in Scotland) is nearly as high but not so long as the Avon Aqueduct. Walks can be had west of the Aqueduct moorings, along the hillside on the south side of the River Almond, tracing the course of the Lade.

Almond Aqueduct to Edinburgh:

ThumbnailFrom the Almond Aqueduct there is a three mile wooded section to Ratho, a pleasant village with attractive canalside pub. We occasionally use the village as an overnight mooring.

Leaving Ratho we head for Edinburgh city centre just eight miles away. Not an unpleasant run in to the city, and suprisingly rural for much of the way in. We pass over two considerable aqueducts (Scott Russell and the Slateford) en route. Nearing the city we pass through a 'rowing section' of canal used by local schools, University teams, and rowing clubs - then a park. Typical yellow granite Edinburgh town houses dominate as we make the final approach to the Leamingtom Bridge (a century old restored and operational lift bridge). Through this lovely old structure we enter Lochrin Basin and Edinburgh Quay.

The moorings in Lochrin Basin are just 10 -15 minutes walk from Edinburgh Castle, The Royal Mile, and Princes Street. Edinburgh is Edinburgh - too much to describe here, other than to say 'there is just so much that's magnificent, with an atmosphere that is magical (you will guess we are fans).

The Standard Cruises:

So, the standard cruises follow. We can vary the cruises somewhat to suit your own requirements. The Standard Cruises are listed shortest through to longest. Remember that the number of days relate to full periods of 24 hours - so, for example, a 6 day cruise actually spans 7 dates.

THREE DAY SHORT BREAK: Falkirk Wheel to Edinburgh & Return (REF:3A):
On Day 1 Arrive about 11am at our Falkirk Wheel Basin moorings. We ascend the Falkirk Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Linlithgow where we moor overnight.
On Day 2 Cruise from Linlithgow to Edinburgh, Lochrin Basin.
On Day 3 We retrace our steps westwards, back towards the Falkirk Wheel, mooring overnight at Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).
On Day 4 Morning cruise back to the Falkirk Wheel.

Notes: Although this three day cruise covers the whole of the Union canal from the Falkirk Wheel to Edinburgh there is not too much time available for walks or visits away from the boat. It would, however, suit those guests who want a short break with most of the time spent actually cruising, having no particular wish to visit attractions away from the canal.

THREE DAY SHORT BREAK: 'Taster' of both the Union and Forth & Clyde canals from the Falkirk Wheel & Return:
(REF:3B):

Day 1:
Arrive about 11am at our Falkirk Wheel Basin moorings. We ascend the Falkirk Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Linlithgow where we moor overnight.
Day 2: We cruise towards Edinburgh, but turn after crossing the Almond Aqueduct. We head back towards Falkirk and moor overnight at Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).
Day 3: We continue westwards back to the Falkirk Wheel but then fully descend, via the Wheel and Jubilee Lock, down onto the Forth & Clyde canal. Here we cruise west to Twechar, before turning to moor overnight at Auchinstarry.
Day 4: We retrace our steps to our Falkirk Wheel Basin moorings to end the cruise at about 11am.

Notes: A good cruise option for those needing to limit the cruise to 3 full days - albeit with some very attractive parts of the canal covered in a relatively short period of time. It would suit those guests who want a short break with most of the time spent actually cruising, having no particular wish to visit attractions away from the canal.

FOUR DAY SHORT BREAK: Falkirk Wheel to Edinburgh (with Edinburgh stopover) & Return:
(REF:4A):

Day 1: Arrive about 11am at our Falkirk Wheel Basin moorings. We ascend the Falkirk Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Linlithgow where we moor overnight.
Day 2: Linlithgow to Edinburgh, Lochrin Basin.
Day 3: We remain static within Lochrin Basin to allow visits to Edinburgh city centre attractions
Day 4: We retrace our steps westwards, back towards the Falkirk Wheel, mooring overnight at Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).
Day 5: Morning cruise back to the Falkirk Wheel.

Notes: An excellent short break option - seeing all of the attractive Union canal, with the bonus of a convenient mooring spending some quality time in Scotland's fasinating capital.

FOUR DAY SHORT BREAK: Union and Forth & Clyde canals from the Falkirk Wheel & Return:
(REF 4B):

Day 1: Arrive about noon (before lunch) at our Falkirk Wheel Basin moorings. We ascend the Falkirk Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Linlithgow where we moor overnight.
Day 2: Before continuing east there is time for a mornings visit to Linlithgow and its Palace. Then we cruise towards Edinburgh, but moor overnight at Almond Aqueduct
Day 3: Turning at the Almond Aqueduct, we head back towards Falkirk, passing through Linlithgow and mooring overnight at Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).  
Day 4: We continue westwards back to the Falkirk Wheel but then fully descend, via the Wheel and Jubilee Lock, down onto the Forth & Clyde canal. Here we cruise further to the west, ascending attractive locks to Auchinstarry and an overnight mooring - time for some country walks in the Kelvin Valley Park.
Day 5: We continue west for a short distance to Twechar where we will turn and head back eastwards to the Falkirk Wheel to end the cruise at about noon (before lunch).

Notes: A good cruise option for those needing to limit the cruise to 4 full days - albeit with some very attractive parts of the canal covered in a relatively short period of time. Again it would suit those guests who want a short break with most of the time spent actually cruising but with some limited time to visit canalside attractions/walks etc.

FIVE DAY CRUISE: Union and Forth & Clyde canals from the Falkirk Wheel & Return (with Edinburgh stopover):
(REF 5A):

Day 1: Arrive about noon (before lunch) at our Falkirk Wheel Basin moorings. We descend Jubillee Lock onto the Forth & Clyde canal and cruise west to Auchinstarry. Afternoon opportunity for some country walks in the Kelvin Valley Park.
Day 2: We continue west for a short distance to Twechar but then turn and head back eastwards to the Falkirk Wheel - this time we ascend the Wheel onto the Union canal. Overnight mooring at Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).
Day 3: Woodcockdale to Edinburgh  
Day 4: Remain static at Lochrin Basin in Edinburgh for visits to city centre attractions.
Day 5: Edinburgh to Linlithgow
Day 6: Return to Falkirk Wheel moorings to end cruise about noon (before lunch).

Notes: A good cruise option for those needing to limit the cruise to 5 full days - with the most attractive parts of the canal covered in a relatively short period of time. Taking less than a week, but with a nice mix of actual cruising and opportunities to visit Edinburgh attractions.

FIVE DAY CRUISE: Union Canal Cruise with Edinburgh and Linlithgow Stopovers:
(REF:5B):

Day 1: Arrive about noon (before lunch) at our Falkirk Wheel Basin moorings. We ascend the Falkirk Wheel onto the Union Canal and cruise to Linlithgow, where we moor overnight.
Day 2: Before continuing east there is time for a mornings visit to Linlithgow and its Palace. Then we cruise towards Edinburgh, but moor overnight at Almond Aqueduct
Day 3 and 4: - In the morning of Day 3 we cruise straight through to Edinburgh Quay, arriving there some time before lunch. Will remain at these mooring until first thing on Day 5 giving a full day and a half for visiting Edinburgh's attractions.  
Day 5: We head back westwards retracing our steps to Linlithgow.
Day 6: Return to our Falkirk Wheel moorings about noon (before lunch).

Notes: A good cruise option for those wanting to 'absorb' Edinburgh, visit Mary Queen of Scots' Palace, and combine that with a pleasant cruise on one of the prettiest yet quietest canals in the country.

SIX DAY CRUISE: Forth & Clyde and Union canals (Now including the Kelpies) from the Falkirk Wheel & Return:
(REF:6A):

Day 1: Arrive at approx 4pm. We stay on our moorings overnight in preparation for an early start on day 2.
Day 2: Falkirk Wheel descending on to the Forth & Clyde, then cruise to Cadder (of Burke & Hare fame), before turning to moor overnight at the 'Stables' just west of Kirkintilloch. This days cruise takes in the prettiest, almost river like, parts of the Forth & Clyde canal.
Day 3: From the Stables we return eastwards descending the Castlecary Locks and on to Falkirk. Rather than turning up onto the Falkirk Wheel, we take the 3 to 4 mile descent down the 14 locks to the newly formed Helix Park - and of course the now renown Kelpies. If we were to continue much further east it would take us onto tidal waters, so we moor overnight in the 'shadow' of the Kelpies - some colourful photo opportunities come darkness.
Day 4: 'First thing' we retrace our steps westwards up the 14 locks to the Falkirk Wheel. This time we ascend the Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).
Day 5: Woodcockdale to Edinburgh - a delightful rural canal cruise, with panoramic views to the north over the Firth of Forth to Fife, and south to the Pentlands. A stop for lunch en-route at the Almond Aqueduct (almost as high as the Avon Aqueduct, but a shorter expanse), before heading into the capital.
Day 6: Edinburgh to Linlithgow.
Day 7: After a morning opportunity to visit Linlithgow Palace, we return to the Falkirk Wheel where cruise ends at our moorings in the basin at about 4pm.

Notes: This covers the prettiest parts of the Forth & Clyde canal and the whole of the rural Union canal. Much of the emphasis is on the actual cruising - but with an opportunity to see the Kelpies and a short visit to Linlithgow. 

SEVEN DAY CRUISE: Forth & Clyde and Union canals (Stopover at the Kelpies, a day in Edinburgh, and opportunity to visit Linlithgow Palace) from the Falkirk Wheel & Return:
(REF:7A):

Day 1
: Arrive at approx 4pm. We stay on our moorings overnight in preparation for an early start on day 2.
Day 2: Falkirk Wheel descending on to the Forth & Clyde, then cruise to Cadder (of Burke & Hare fame), before turning to moor overnight at the 'Stables' just west of Kirkintilloch. This days cruise takes in the prettiest, almost river like, parts of the Forth & Clyde canal.
Day 3: From the Stables we return eastwards descending the Castlecary Locks and on to Falkirk. Rather than turning up onto the Falkirk Wheel, we take the 3 to 4 mile descent down the 14 locks to the newly formed Helix Park - and of course the now renown Kelpies. If we were to continue much further east it would take us onto tidal waters, so we moor overnight in the 'shadow' of the Kelpies - some colourful photo opportunities come darkness.
Day 4: 'First thing' we retrace our steps westwards up the 14 locks to the Falkirk Wheel. This time we ascend the Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).  
Day 5: Woodcockdale to Edinburgh - a delightful rural canal cruise, with panoramic views to the north over the Firth of Forth to Fife, and south to the Pentlands. A stop for lunch en-route at the Almond Aqueduct (almost as high as the Avon Aqueduct, but a shorter expanse), before heading into the capital.
Day 6: Static at Edinburgh moorings, within walking distance of the city centre attractions.
Day 6: Edinburgh to Linlithgow.
Day 7: After a morning opportunity to visit Linlithgow Palace, we return to the Falkirk Wheel where cruise ends at our moorings in the basin at about 4pm.

Notes: This covers the prettiest parts of the Forth & Clyde canal and the whole of the rural Union canal. A good all round seven day cruise with loads of cruising, yet opportunities to spend time visiting top attaractions - Kelpies, Edinburgh, Linlithgow Palace. 

SEVEN DAY CRUISE: Forth & Clyde and Union canals (Stopovers at Edinburgh and Linlithgow with 'walking options') from the Falkirk Wheel & Return:
(REF:7B):

Day 1: Arrive Falkirk Wheel moorings about 4pm ready for starting cruise first thing on Day 2;
Day 2: Falkirk Wheel to Auchinstarry: We descend Jubillee Lock onto the Forth & Clyde canal and cruise west to Auchinstarry, and then on to Twechar where we turn and come back the short distance to Auchinstarry. That stretch of canal is probably the prettiest on the Forth & Clyde (almost river like). The stop at Auchinstarry allows for afternoon walks to Croy Hill and/or in the Kelvin Valley Park area (known for its walks);
Day 3: Auchinstarry to Linlithgow: Return eastwards on the Forth & Clyde canal then ascend the Falkirk Wheel onto the Union canal. Make our way to Linlithgow for our next overnight mooring;
Day 4: Linlithgow to Almond Aqueduct: Roughly a half day (afternoon) cruise after a morning visit to Linlithgow town and Linlithgow Palace (birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots);
Day 5: Almond Aqueduct to Edinburgh: A half day cruise to moorings within 10 minutes walk of Edinburgh Castle, the Royal Mile, and Princes Street;
Day 6: Static at Edinburgh; Edinburgh is marvellous - we suggest you might want a day and a half in the city - there is just so much to see and do;
Day 7: Edinburgh to Linlithgow: A full day cruise to retrace our steps towards the Falkirk Wheel;
Day 8: Linlithgow to Falkirk Wheel: Time to stop en route on top of the Avon Aqueduct and to take a walk down to the River Avon below the Aqueduct (Muiravonside Country Park). Or later walk up from the Falkirk Wheel to the Roughcastle Roman Fort on the nearby Antonine Wall. 'Cruise ends' at the Falkirk Wheel about 4pm.

Notes: This cruise will suit those who want a seven cruise day but with time for walks and stopovers at the most interesting places. Time to Walk at Auchinstarry and the Avon Aqueduct, see the Antonine Wall, Visit Linlithgow Palace, Full day in Edinburgh and still see the nicest bits of the canals - of our favorite parts, only Bowling on the Clyde is missed.

SEVEN DAY CRUISE: Forth & Clyde and Union canals (Glasgow, Kelpies and Edinburgh) from the Falkirk Wheel & Return:
(REF:7C):

Day 1
: Arrive at approx 4pm. We stay on our moorings overnight in preparation for an early start on day 2.
Day 2: Falkirk Wheel descending on to the Forth & Clyde, then cruise to the 'Stables' overnight moorings just west of Kirkintilloch.
Day 3: We head westwards to where the Glasgow Branch takes us into the centre of Glasgow, before heading back onto the mainline.  At Stockingfield junction we head east to moor overnight at Auchinstarry.
Day 4: From Auchinstarry we continue east descending the Castlecary Locks and on to Falkirk. Rather than turning up onto the Falkirk Wheel, we take the 3 to 4 mile descent down the 14 locks to the Helix - and of course the now renown Kelpies. We moor overnight in their 'shadow' - some colourful photo opportunities come darkness.
Day 5: 'First thing' we retrace our steps up the 14 locks to the Falkirk Wheel. This time we ascend the Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).  
Day 6: Woodcockdale to Edinburgh - a delightful rural canal cruise, with panoramic views to the north over the Firth of Forth to Fife, and south to the Pentlands. A stop for lunch en-route at the Almond Aqueduct (almost as high as the Avon Aqueduct, but a shorter expanse), before heading into the capital.
Day 7: Edinburgh to Linlithgow.
Day 8: After a morning opportunity to visit Linlithgow Palace, we return to the Falkirk Wheel where cruise ends at our moorings in the basin at about 4pm.

Notes: This covers just about the whole of the Scottish Lowlands canal system. Much of the emphasis is on the actual cruising - but with an opportunity to see the Kelpies and a short visit to Linlithgow. It would suit clients that already know the Glasgow & Edinburgh visitor attractions.  

SEVEN DAY CRUISE: Forth & Clyde and Union canals (Bowling, Glasgow and Edinburgh) from the Falkirk Wheel & Return:
(REF:7D):

Day 1
: Arrive at approx 4pm. We stay on our moorings overnight in preparation for an early start on day 2.
Day 2: Falkirk Wheel descending on to the Forth & Clyde, then cruise to the 'Stables' overnight moorings just west of Kirkintilloch.
Day 3: We head westwards, early, to arrive at the Maryhill locks for the 10 mile descent to Bowling at the River Clyde.
Day 4: We repeat the locking process and route of the day before, but in reverse - mooring at the 'Stables' overnight.
Day 5: Again, 'first thing' we pass through the Scottish Canals staff operated bridges at Hillhead and Twechar then head back to the Falkirk Wheel. This time we ascend the Wheel onto the Union canal and cruise to Woodcockdale (near to the Avon Aqueduct).  
Day 6: Woodcockdale to Edinburgh.   
Day 7: Edinburgh to Linlithgow.
Day 8: After a morning opportunity to visit Linlithgow Palace, we return to the Falkirk Wheel where cruise ends at our moorings in the basin at about 4pm.

Notes: This covers just about the whole of the Scottish Lowlands canal system. The emphasis is on the actual cruising and we have to admit that, apart from an opportunity to visit Linlithgow Palace, there is little time for visits or walks. It would suit clients that already know the Glasgow & Edinburgh, and therefore wish just to cruise the route.  

For those of you coming from overseas, the following link will take you to the "Welcome to Scotland" website - for loads of information useful to those planning an extended stay in Scotland.